Would you Dare to Zip over the Niagara Falls

Niagara waterfalls are the latest natural wonder that has found its place in the zip line map. The zip line over Niagara Falls offers everyone a chance to indulge in an adrenaline-pumping dive into the churning mist of steep waterfalls. And, the speeds that top forty mile per hour will surely pump up your enthusiasm.

Earlier, elevated zip line cable rides were introduced as a new way to explore the jungle canopies. Now, zip lines have become a must-have addition in natural habitats to attract more tourists to the place. In fact, zip line is a trend that has uncovered a rift between people who approach Mother Nature like monks and those who wish to have extreme adventurous experiences.

“We can’t make these into museums,” argued Tom Benson, who is the co-founder and chief experience officer at WildPlay Element Parks that built the Niagara Falls zip line. “How do you take a teenager and get them away from a game console to something that is going to capture their imagination?”

Commercial zip lines have become much popular in the US and this has occurred in the past five years. Today, there are about 200 zip lines in the country. This means that more and more people are now interested in experiencing nature the Indiana Jones way.

People can ride above tree canopy at New River Gorge in West Virginia, glide over the Santa Catalina Island of California, or they can race the air above the lush Hawaiian landscapes. To add to the fun and experience, many of these zip lines have additional elements as well.

For instance, the zip line at Catalina Island stops for presentations at some of the designated “eco-stations”, where the zip line ride set up in the Copper Canyon of Mexico runs for more than a mile and half. The zip line in Nepal has a drop of about 2,000 feet, and that in Sun City of South Africa is capable of achieving top speeds of 100 mph.

“You feel all this air rushing past you. It’s this great almost roller coaster-esque feeling,” Quillan Brady said just after riding on the new Eagle Flyer zip line at Lake George in New York’s Adirondacks. “But really, what I think makes it is looking around and seeing all this natural New York beauty.”

Niagara Falls area resident James Bannister feels it in a different way though. To him, the zip line is just a “circus midway-style attraction.” Bannister says, “Every once in a while somebody comes along and says, ‘Boy, you could build another great attraction here!’ as if the falls itself wasn’t enough of an attraction.”